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Cape Cod Windmill 2

Cape Cod Windmill 2

A few nice Charlie Countryman images I found:

Cape Cod Windmill 2 Charlie Countryman
Image by foroyar22 The Windmill House on Old Mill Point, West Harwich, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The steep-roofed English-style house with a windmill attached, was built by W.H. Doble in the 1920s off Lower County Road at the mouth of the Herring River. Mr. Doble had attempted to get an authentic Cape Cod windmill to relocate on to the Point, but had been unable to do so. The Windmill House looks out over the marsh and Nantucket Sound. The windmill was built to resemble windmills typically found in Norfolk England. It is in the style of a 17th century wooden tower mill called a smock mill, named because of its appearance of a countryman's linen smock as it sloped elegantly along eight sides, and included a boat-shaped cap. It is a reproduction windmill, and has never functioned as a working mill. Additional information and photos can be found in the book Windmills of New England: Their Genius, Madness, History & Future by Daniel Lombardo, published by On Cape Publications in 2003. This image is scanned from a slide that I took in 1975. The proper identification and description of this windmill has been updated on 8 April 2010, and several comments by Flickr enthusiasts have been added since.

Cape Cod windmill Charlie Countryman
Image by foroyar22 The Windmill House on Old Mill Point, West Harwich, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The steep-roofed English-style house with a windmill attached, was built by W.H. Doble in the 1920s off Lower County Road at the mouth of the Herring River. Mr. Doble had attempted to get an authentic Cape Cod windmill to relocate on to the Point, but had been unable to do so. The Windmill House looks out over the marsh and Nantucket Sound. The windmill was built to resemble windmills typically found in Norfolk England. It is in the style of a 17th century wooden tower mill called a smock mill, named because of its appearance of a countryman's linen smock as it sloped elegantly along eight sides, and included a boat-shaped cap. It is a reproduction windmill, and has never functioned as a working mill. Additional information and photos can be found in the book Windmills of New England: Their Genius, Madness, History & Future by Daniel Lombardo, published by On Cape Publications in 2003. This image is scanned from a slide that I took in 1975. The proper identification and description of this windmill has been updated on 8 April 2010.

 
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